Unfinished left by Ben additions before 1998 after 9/11/2002 by his father & friends.

 

Under construction update: November 9, 2009 nosmokesignals.net

 

BF_Under Desk

"I remember Ben Fuller from the "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" days of Silent Software. Ben was hired to make software tools, provide support for the Amiga computers, and anything else that needed doing.... When Ben was starting at Silent Software, he had a cubicle in the divider maze in the back room. Will and I had moved out of the maze, and Katsumi Tayama had already gone back to school, so Ben was sharing the maze with Michael St. Laurent. Not long after Ben arrived, the maze was dismantled, and Ben was set up in a divider cubicle that was part of the front reception area. Reichart has a picture of this, and a picture of Ben sleeping under his desk there." James Host ..

BF_Testing WFRR ..................................P01851 Ben Cristine and Reichart Von Wolfshied............................Ben and Mitch Lopes. ..................................... BF_peekaboo2

Re: Emailing: P01851 Ben Cristine and Reichart Von Wolfshield.jpg Wednesday, February 4, 2009 4:06 PM

From: "Reichart Von Wolfsheild" <reichart@prolific.com>
To:   "Glenn Fuller" <ggfuller@yahoo.com>
Cc:  "Reichart Von Wolfshield" <Reichart@prolific.com>

Sorry, that is not me.
I have had very long hair most of my life, and specifically back then.
That person looks like they are Mediterranean well.
Reichart...
Glenn Fuller wrote:
> The message is ready to be sent with the following file or link attachments:
> P01851 Ben Cristine and Reichart Von Wolfshield.jpg

See P01851 Ben Cristine his wife and Reichart and the photo of Reichart today below. Age about 28 years with Cristine 1989 age 48 4/14/2009.

..Last Visited: 9/14/2008  

Ben’s achievements now were set toward goals he charted as a man and majority provider for his family.  He needed to step out on his own, and now a decision point was coming which would form the basis of a truly great person, a gentle man, and a solid achiever in many circles.  In 1988 he attended the 1988 Amiga Developer's Conference in Washington, DC.  It was this year he was hired by Reichart Von Wolfshield of Silent Software, Inc. to work on a network solution for the Amiga computer.  Ben moved to Glendale, CA, created a 6502 cross-assembler and other 6502 cross-development support tools for the Amiga.  His devotion and energy was engrossed in development and he performed programmer support functions at Silent Software during the development of the computer game Who Framed Roger Rabbit.  Ben was given on-screen credit for "Special Magic."  He liked that.

Still with Silent Software in 1989 Ben recoded major portions of the Amiga version of Who Framed Roger Rabbit to improve performance.  He converted the source from Manx Aztec C to Lattice C and was given on-screen credit for "Written By."

Ben was a challenge as a child, had his own way of approaching tasks and quite independent.  It would be a trademark and here at Silent Software with a heavy heart I’m sure he found the contention was not producing the results he expected and demanded not only of himself, but the people on his team, the company.  As I write this my grandchildren are watching a movie ANTZ about an ant worker “Z” who dared to be different and dared to fight the good fight albeit at the peril of his “career” and perhaps prophetic, his life.  “What are you saying?  We are the “colony”!  His sentiments exactly, the workers are the company, not management alone, but in partnership.

I believe reluctantly Ben voluntarily left Silent Software to return to Fuller Computer Systems.  He returned to Mesa, Arizona.  My son was not a presumptuous person.  He gave credit where credit was due, and I am certain it hurt him to leave what had become a dream come true to again forge ahead again virtually alone, a new path, find more “cheese” and go on with life.  Ben began work on an upgrade to Project D.  That was so much like Ben, even as a child.  I would watch him hit an obstacle and never complain, but find a way.  He was a master at that positive way to meet life’s challenges.  Ben attended the 1989 Amiga Developer's Conference in San Fransico, CA.

Prolific.com

Los Angeles Future Salon: 2007 Meetings - [Cached Version]
Last Visited: 9/14/2008  
Reichart Von Wolfsheild, Founder and CTO, Prolific Publishing

Abstract: Web industry veteran Reichart Von Wolfsheild will present and demonstrate qtask (http://www.qtask.com), an online Task Tracking and Project Management platform for "Whole Life Management."
...
Bio: Prolific Founder and CTO Baron RK {"Reichart") Von Wolfsheild has over 25 years experience in software and hardware design.He has appeared in magazines such as Time, Life, and BusinessWeek.He is frequently quoted in computer magazines, and makes regular appearances on television, lecturing at universities, and speaking on industry panels.
Los Angeles Future Salon (LAFS) at UCLA - [Cached Version]
Published on: 7/3/2005    Last Visited: 2/3/2007  
Feb 4 (Noon-4pm), Ackerman Union, Room 2408, Reichart Von Wolfsheild, Prolific, Qtask: An Online "Whole Life Management" PlatformMar 4 (Noon-4pm), Kerckhoff Hall Room 417, Topic TBD, Ideas?Email us!
...
Reichart Von Wolfsheild, Founder and CTO, Prolific Publishing
...
Bio: Prolific Founder and CTO Baron RK {"Reichart") Von Wolfsheild has over 25 years experience in software and hardware design.He has appeared in magazines such as Time, Life, and BusinessWeek.He is frequently quoted in computer magazines, and makes regular appearances on television, lecturing at universities, and speaking on industry panels.

Prolific.com 2009

James J. Host graduated high school co-valedictorian, is a former member of Mensa, and holds a B.S. in biology from Caltech, specializing in molecular biology.
With a special talent for low level assembly, he mastered the popular microchips including the 6502, 8088, as well as an array of microcontrollers and embedded systems, developing dozens of successful commercial products.

More recently, he has turned his talents to the growing field of forensic programming and firefighting, assisting Prolific's clients to remove critical failures in other companies' products.

www.exreplaytv.com View Guestbook
James Host
2007-03-04 10:50:08

Just a few notes about Ben Fuller, from James Host []

I remember Ben Fuller from the "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" days of Silent Software. Ben was hired to make software tools, provide support for the Amiga computers, and anything else that needed doing.

Ben took a bit of getting used to, and I was scared of him at first. It was the eye thing. One of his eyes was smaller than the other, and the small eye didn't track what he was looking at. Ben had a tendency to keep the small eye half-shut, and to turn his face so that the larger eye was toward the person he was talking to.

Ben was also n-n-n-n-nineteen.

I got over being scared, and considered Ben a friend. A man is known by what he does.

Ben was an Amiga hacker extraordinaire. One of his neat hacks was to take a Kickstart floppy, and change the graphic display, so that it would have a nice check mark with two boing balls bouncing on its end, instead of the awful four-color representation of a floppy that Commodore had made. Ben was also tinkering with Project D in those days, getting ready to put out an upgrade version with a nicer looking desktop and more"parameter" files.

The 6502 cross assembler we were using for "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" became slower and slower with each added label. Ben volunteered to write a new one for us, and had it working in a few weeks. He called it "Cas64." Reichart and Michael St. Laurent had finished up Will Ware's Amiga version of "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," but the code w! as left in an odd state. Files were scattered across two floppies, and playing the game on a one-drive Amiga meant swapping the two floppies a considerable number of times. Ben did some consolidation and rearranging of the code and files,
resulting in fewer swaps. Later, Ben was in charge of implementing the foreign translations of "Who Framed Roger Rabbit." Technically, Ben was my supervisor at this time, but generally, he was content to let me do my work :)

Michael St. Laurent had been working on a personal contact manager program for the Amiga. Ben did some work on this too. I suspect that he entirely rewrote the program, rather than working from Michael St. Laurent's code. (Then Leo Schwab and Will Ware worked on it, then Scott Etherton and Will Ware, then the Windows 3.0 version was programmed by Kenneth Dullea, Edgar Tolentino, Scott Etherton, and! I -- it's still in limbo, and some day I'm sure it will be resurrected by a new programming team for Windows 200x). The fun they had.

We worked and played at Silent Software. One of the things we'd do is shoot rubber bands at each other. Then Eric Daniels told us of a mishap suffered by legendary animator Tex Avery. After that, Ben was protective of his face, so we'd shoot the rubber bands at the ceiling, hoping they would ricochet and fall on the intended victim.

Although Ben would say, "Do one thing and do it well," that did not stop him from trying other things. We had a nerf ping-pong table set up. Ben gave it the ol' college try, and did not do well. He said that this was due to lack of stereoscopic vision. To even things out, his opponents would agree to play with one eye closed. Reichart got to be so ! good at the game that we made him play with one eye closed all the time. I told Ben that the separation of eyes gave stereoscopic vision only to about 20 feet; at greater distance, parallax and shadowing cues provide clues to depth. I heard Ben quoting that line several times later.

At the office, Ben and Christina, our office manager, would play a little game. He would chug from a can of coca-cola, then belch, then say,"excuse me." She would call him "pig" and run toward him and give his hair a yank. He would say, "owww," and put his hand on his hair, and give a disdaining look. They would repeat this scenario several times a day.

One nifty place Ben would visit was the party store at the corner of Pacific and Broadway in Glendale, walking distance from the office. One day! Ben surprised the whole software team with "Roger Rabbit Goodie bags." I still have mine. It contained a whistle and a party hat. Another time, Ben brought back some little plastic gold-colored trophies. He wrote "Pun of the day" on a bit of paper, and taped it to one of the trophies. That trophy spent some of its time on Ben's desk, a lot of time on my desk, and a little time on the desks of others. As of this writing (Jan 2003), it's in Reichart's trophy case.

We took a trip to Disneyland one day, and rode around on the train for quite a while. Ben expressed interest in some day coming back, and renting Videopolis for parties. Another time, the Silent Software gang went to see an IMAX double feature. The first movie was about the Grand Canyon. I don't remember the name of it; if it hadn't h! ad naked people in it, I would not have remembered the movie at all. [A quick Internet search suggests that it was"Grand Canyon: The Hidden Secrets."] The second movie was "The Dream is Alive," a movie about the space shuttle program. Ben was entranced by the movie, and, on the way home in the car, he talked avidly of space exploration. "Is the dream still alive?" he asked me.

When Ben was starting at Silent Software, he had a cubicle in the divider maze in the back room. Will and I had moved out of the maze, and Katsumi Tayama had already gone back to school, so Ben was sharing the maze with Michael St. Laurent. Not long after Ben arrived, the maze was dismantled, and Ben was set up in a divider cubicle that was part of the front reception area. Reichart has a picture of this, and a picture of Ben sleeping under his desk there.

The gadgets, or "! the boy is known by his toys"
A nifty thing that Ben had was an early model RCA SVHS VCR. It had
a full frame buffer, and could do lots of cool effects, like making little
static multiple pictures, or doing "solarizing." Ben bought some
videocassettes, and would watch them over and over. The one that got the
most play was "Star Trek IV.

Commodore came out with a new computer during this period, and Ben
got one. I think it was the Amiga 2500HD, but I could be wrong.

Ben went to a couple of Amiga shows during this period. He came
back from one of them with an armload of "Project D Backs Me Up" T-shirts.
I still have the one he gave me.
Ben and Reichart bought a pair of matching bicycles. One day, on
the way in to the office, Ben h! ad ridden through a patch of gnarly thorns.
I remember him picking those out of the tire. The inner tube was so
punctured it had to be thrown out. Ben got what looked like a strip of
tough plastic, which was supposed to be a thorn protector, and installed;that in the tire.

All good things come to an end
The last time I saw Ben was at the "World of Commodore" show in
Pasadena. I don't remember if this was 1992 or 1993.
Snippets:
Ben's favorite movie: "Star Trek IV."
Ben's favorite song: "Living on Video." I remember Ben and
Reichart having a long discussion about using an opening riff from this
song, and how much of it could be used before it became piracy.
Ben's favorite thing to say: "That's what SHE-E-E said!"
! ;

    http://news.com.com/2100-1023-954176.html

> In ReplayTV Case, Fair Use Gets Some Play: The Electronic Frontier Foundation last week won an opportunity to establish whether ReplayTV owners have an affirmative right to use the device for recording television programs and skipping commercials. US District Court Judge Florence-Marie Cooper, who last Monday issued a stay on the consumer suit, decided Friday to deny the entertainment industry motion for dismissal, and combined the consumer suit with the entertainment industry lawsuit filed last fall against ReplayTV producer SonicBlue. "[T]he issue of whether the Newmark Plaintiffs' use of the ReplayTV DVRs' send-show and commercial-skipping features constitutes fair use will most likely figure prominently in both the ReplayTV action and the Newmark action," wrote Judge Cooper.

DVR War casualties. How many? "I'm not a crook if I skip commercials or share a news interview of myself with my mom using the SendShow feature rather than sending her a videotape," said plaintiff Craig Newmark, founder of Craigslist.org and a ReplayTV owner. "I shouldn't have to worry about getting prosecuted, but the Turner Broadcasting CEO tells us that taking a bathroom break is criminal." August 18, 2002 No. 5.3  .  The Filter  .  08.19.02

Need a plumber. Flush not working.

WORK IN PROGRESS:

Look at latest SB Claims Holdings filing for Administrative Fees which covers the history of the mischief in SB Bankruptcy.